GALLERY

THE TULSA RACE MASSACRE

A Special thanks to the Tulsa Historic Society and Museum for these photographs. Hundreds more photographs along with information and resources can be found on the organization's website.

These photographs are some of the most graphic visual records of the destruction that resulted from the Tulsa Race Massacre. Several photographs depict some of the notable black Tulsans  of the time.

Slain victim

Photo courtesy: the Ruth Sigler Avery Collection held at the Oklahoma State University -Tulsa Library Special Collections and Archives. Description: Slain victim.

Remnants of Greenwood Community.

Photo courtesy: the Ruth Sigler Avery Collection held at the Oklahoma State University -Tulsa Library Special Collections and Archives. Description: Remnants of Greenwood Community.

Looters

Photo courtesy: the Ruth Sigler Avery Collection held at the Oklahoma State University -Tulsa Library Special Collections and Archives. Description: Looters

Black men and women with armed

Photo courtesy: the Ruth Sigler Avery Collection held at the Oklahoma State University -Tulsa Library Special Collections and Archives. Description: Black men and women with armed white men

Greenwood and Archer streets,

Photo courtesy: the Ruth Sigler Avery Collection held at the Oklahoma State University -Tulsa Library Special Collections and Archives. Description: Greenwood and Archer Streets.

Smaller The destroyed Dreamland Theatre,

Photo Courtesy: Tulsa Historical Society and Museum Description: The destroyed Dreamland Theatre, located at 127 North Greenwood Avenue in Tulsa, OK, following the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre. At this time, John Wesley Williams and wife, Loula Cotten Williams, owned and operated the theater.

Smaller The burning of the Greenwood Dis

Photo Courtesy: Tulsa Historical Society and Museum Description: The burning of the Greenwood District during the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre. The immediate foreground shows the building containing the Village Blacksmith Shop

smaller 5 men sifting through rubble

Photo Courtesy: Tulsa Historical Society and Museum Description: Five men sifting through rubble.

Blocks of destroyed homes in the

Photo Courtesy: Tulsa Historical Society and Museum Description: Blocks of destroyed homes in the Greenwood District following the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre.

Smaller The American Red Cross Disaster

Photo Courtesy: Tulsa Historical Society and Museum Description: The American Red Cross Disaster Relief Headquarters following the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre.

Charred remains of black man

Photo Courtesy: Tulsa Historical Society and Museum Description: The charred remains of an African American laying on the ground near the Saint Louis & San Francisco Frisco Railway Depot following the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre.

Little Africa On Fire

Photo Courtesy: Tulsa Historical Society and Museum Description: The burning Greenwood District during the Tulsa Race Massacre, 1921. First Street is visible in the foreground on which is located the Bessemer Gas Engine Company and the Eagle Hotel.

Temporary houses set up by Red Cross

Photo Courtesy: Tulsa Historical Society and Museum Description: Several temporary houses set up by the American Red Cross for displaced Greenwood District residents following the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre. This photograph depicts three wood-frame buildings each with a canvas roof.

Individuals viewing destruction

Photo Courtesy: Tulsa Historical Society and Museum Description: Individuals in the street viewing the destruction of the Greenwood District during the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre. The Woods Building built in 1914 and located at 105 North Greenwood Avenue is visible in the background.

Portrait of Ellis Woods

Photo Courtesy: Tulsa Historical Society and Museum Description: Portrait of Ellis W. Woods, the first principal of Booker T. Washington High School. He lived at 531 North Detroit Avenue, and his home was destroyed during the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre.

PHOTOG~1

Photo Courtesy: Tulsa Historical Society and Museum Description: Photograph of Peter A. Chappelle, a graduate of Hampton University. He received his law degree from Howard University. In 1914, he moved to Sapulpa, and in 1920 he opened a law office in Tulsa with B. C. Franklin and Isaia H. Spears

Portrait of B.C. Franklin

Photo Courtesy: Tulsa Historical Society and Museum Description: Portrait of Buck Colbert B. C. Franklin, father of Mozella Franklin Jones and John Hope Franklin. B. C. Franklin was a member of the bar of the State of Oklahoma for fifty years. For forty years he practiced law in Tulsa.

Burning Buildings, N. Tulsa's W. S.

Photo Courtesy: Tulsa Historical Society and Museum Description: Burning buildings on the west side of North Cincinnati Avenue during the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre. The stone building on the far left is the Oklahoma Pipe & Supply company located at 2 North Cincinnati.

Hillside overlooking Greenwood

Photo Courtesy: Tulsa Historical Society and Museum Description: An image taken from a hillside overlooking the burning Greenwood District during the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre. The image shows numerous individuals on the hillside. Some of the objects visible in the photograph include whi

Man looking at deceased man

Photo Courtesy: Tulsa Historical Society and Museum Description: An image taken during the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre. The photograph depicts a dead man lying in the street with a newspaper covering his face. A man in a white striped shirt looks down at the body. The words, Negro Slain in

Deceased blk man by railroad tracks

Photo Courtesy: Tulsa Historical Society and Museum Description: An African American man lying dead beside the railroad tracks during the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre. The man's white shirt contains a large blood stain. Another photograph of this scene in the collection confirms that this l

Detained African Americans

Photo Courtesy: Tulsa Historical Society and Museum Description: African Americans detained during the Tulsa Race Massacre, 1921. The photo shows a small truck loaded with people. A woman sits with her legs dangling from the back of the truck. An armed man rides on the running board of the vehicle.

Mt. Zion Baptist Church on fire

Photo Courtesy: Tulsa Historical Society and Museum Description: An image from the first edition of the book Events of the Tulsa Disaster by Mary E. Jones Parrish. The photograph depicts Mt. Zion Baptist Church, located at 419 North Elgin Avenue, burning during the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre

Greenwood Avenue circa 1925

Photo Courtesy: Tulsa Historical Society and Museum Description: An image from the first edition of the book Events of the Tulsa Disaster by Mary E. Jones Parrish. The photograph depicts Greenwood Avenue circa 1925 following its reconstruction from the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre.

Plume of smoke covering Greenwood

Photo Courtesy: Tulsa Historical Society and Museum Description: A huge plume of smoke covering the Greenwood District during the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre. The left foreground shows a picket fence surrounding a home. The far right shows a brick building under construction.

Column of black smoke over Greenwood

Photo Courtesy: Tulsa Historical Society and Museum Description: A column of black smoke during the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre. The back of the photograph contains a handwritten caption stating, Scene of Riot.

AFLAT-~1

Photo Courtesy: Tulsa Historical Society and Museum Description: A flat-bed truck produced by the Nash Motor Company parked in front of Convention Hall in Tulsa, OK, during the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre. Convention Hall is located at 101 West Brady Street. A dead African American man lie on the back of the flat bed of the vehicle while several other men are held at gunpoint.

Group being led to Convention Hall

Photo Courtesy: Tulsa Historical Society and Museum Description: A group being led to the Convention Hall during the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre. The front of the postcard contains the printed caption, Captured Negros [sic] on Way to Convention Hall - During Tulsa Race Riot June 1st 1921.

House in Greenwood in 1927

Photo Courtesy: Tulsa Historical Society and Museum Description: A house in Greenwood District located at 356 North Greenwood Avenue owned by Samuel & Lucy Mackley. Samuel Mackley was a porter in a hotel. The picture was taken circa 1927, when the house was rebuilt following the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre.

Destroyed homes in Greenwood

Photo Courtesy: Tulsa Historical Society and Museum Description: Blocks of destroyed homes in Greenwood during the Tulsa Race Massacre of 1921.

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Detained African Americans

Photo Courtesy: Tulsa Historical Society and Museum Description: African Americans detained during the Tulsa Race Massacre, 1921. The photo shows a small truck loaded with people. A woman sits with her legs dangling from the back of the truck. An armed man rides on the running board of the vehicle.